Moira Bonnington
  • Female
  • United Kingdom
Share Twitter

Moira Bonnington's Friends

  • Gemma Bagshaw
  • John Rumsby
  • Louise Carter
  • Will Tatum
  • David Blackmore
  • Roger Knight
  • Jon Stobart
  • Ilya Berkovich
  • Graciela Iglesias Rogers
  • Dr Matthew McCormack
  • Kevin Linch
 

Moira Bonnington's Page

Latest Activity

Moira Bonnington posted a status
"My recent trip to Corsica has brought the pages of the history books to life. especially the Tour de Mortella in the bay of St Florent."
Oct 11, 2011
Will Tatum and Moira Bonnington are now friends
Aug 26, 2011
Louise Carter left a comment for Moira Bonnington
"Hi Moira, Likewise it was lovely to meet you and I enjoyed your paper. Look forward to hearing more about the macaronis anon. best wishes, Louise."
Jul 12, 2011
Graciela Iglesias Rogers left a comment for Moira Bonnington
"Hi Moira, Many thanks! I am glad that you enjoyed my talk. I also enjoyed yours and learnt much on maccaronis and attitudes to gender among soldiers. As promised, here are my details: Graciela Iglesias Rogers Lady Margaret Hall, University of…"
Jul 11, 2011
Gemma Bagshaw left a comment for Moira Bonnington
"Hiya Moira,   No problems! I'm glad I managed to get it all on video. I'm hopefully going to Kelmarsh History Weekend next week so I will take more videos there and put the links up for anyone who's interested.   I'd…"
Jul 11, 2011
Moira Bonnington posted a status
"Thanks to Kevin and Matthew for organising such a great conference. . We all went away buzzing with new ideas and new lines to follow up."
Jul 11, 2011
Moira Bonnington and Gemma Bagshaw are now friends
Jul 10, 2011
Moira Bonnington replied to Kevin Linch's discussion Key texts for a bibliography
"I have read Matthew Hasler Spring's PhD Thesis at Leeds and found it a fascinating study. I'm glad it is now available in book form as it is very readable. I also like Silvia Freybut I found John Houlding rather dry."
Oct 15, 2010
Moira Bonnington and Dr Matthew McCormack are now friends
Oct 12, 2010
Moira Bonnington updated their profile
Oct 12, 2010
Moira Bonnington is now a member of Soldiers and Soldiering in Britain 1750-1815
Oct 10, 2010

Profile Information

Say a bit about your role, I'm a..
student
Affiliation
Leeds University
What interests do you have in the period?
I am researching the life and career of Charles Horneck and I am looking at public and popular perceptions of the officer class especially in the 1770s when macaroni fashion was at its zenith - in particular to the portrayal of the young Horneck as " The Military Macaroni".
Capt and Lieut.Charles Horneck served in America with the Third Footguards from 1777 to 1781.
I am now concentrating on the brief period when Horneck joined his regiment in Jamaica and St Domingue (now Haiti) in the 1790s. I would be interested to exchange is ideas with anyone else who has studied this period of the regimental history
Link to your website
http://militarymacaroni.posterous.com/

About Charles Horneck

Charles Horneck was the son of Kane William Horneck and Hannah Triggs of Plymouth. His great grandfather was the cleric and scholar, Anthony Horneck and his grandfather the soldier William Horneck. Both men were buried in Westminster Abbey.

Although referred to scathingly as a “ little lilly macaroni” in his youth, Charles Horneck appears to have had a distinguished army career reaching the rank of General by the time of his death in 1804 yet no obituary recording his life has been found.

Charles Horneck was educated at Westminster School and bought a commission as Ensign in the Third 3rd Footguards in 1768 . Based at St James barracks, the Guards had a reputation for parading in the nearby park in their finery and enjoying the attractions of London – frequenting the“ nunneries” of St James, the Pantheon, Vauxhall Gardens and Covent Garden. They were the subject of mockery and doubt was thrown on their masculinity, sexual preferences and general conduct. Charles Horneck had developed foppish tastes in clothing and made the acquaintance of the cross dressing French diplomat and spy - The Chevalier D'Eon. He dined with the Chevalier and his associates - Morande and Beaumarchais - and attended masquerades at the Pantheon . For some reason young Horneck was not popular and he attracted the attention of the satirical press as the the subject of two caricatures in the Darly macaroni print series and an article in the satirical press in the early 1770s.

In May 1773, Horneck married Sarah Keppel, the natural daughter of George, the deceased third Earl of Albemarle but the marriage was very shortlived. Mrs eloped with her husband's friend and fellow officer John Scawen less than a year after the wedding. The couple toured extensively on the continent and Horneck eventually petitioned for divorce in 1776. Afterwards he continued to keep "unsuitable" company and became embroiled in the speculation over the sexual identity of the Chevalier D'Eon. After suffering similar insults about his own masculinity, he eventually challenged his accuser De Morande to a duel.
Shortly after this matter was settled, Horneck embarked for America with his regiment .

I am still piecing together his adventures in the American War of Independence and subsequently in Jamaica and St Domingo.



Eventually he returned to England and snippets of evidence show him attending coffee houses and clubs, visiting Bath and even participating in amateur dramatics.

Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Horneck of the 3rd Regiment of Foot Guards exchanged regiments with Campbell of the 62nd Regiment of Foot on 5 June 1789. and two years later me married the daughter of General Gould - Frances Gould in Bath.

I have found reports of service in the West Indies and service in St Domingue and Corsica and am trying to find out more about what he did during this period.

Moira Bonnington's Blog

This is the original Martello Tower

Click on the link to see the Tour de Mortella in St Florent Bay which inspired the English Martello Towers.

http://paglia.orba.free.fr/rando/agriate/salec44.htm

Posted on October 11, 2011 at 9:48

Comment Wall (7 comments)

At 10:21 on October 11, 2010, Rosalind Carr said…
Hello Moira
That research sounds really interesting and I look forward to hearing more about it. Have you come across Stana Nenadic's work on Scottish military officers and polite society?
Rosi
At 9:16 on October 12, 2010, Moira Bonnington said…
At 9:22 on October 12, 2010, Jon Stobart said…
The macaronis are a fascinating subject. Given your interest in Hornbeck and the fact that he clearly travelled widely, I'd be interested in your view on whether this type of consumption was possible/meaningful outside the 'hothouse' of London.
At 18:37 on October 12, 2010, ANDREW LINCOLN said…
Dear Moira,

Thanks for getting in touch. Your project sounds really interesting, with a very clear focus. I'm working my way through C18, and have not yet arrived at the 1770s. If I turn up anything that might look useful to you, I'll let you know!
At 9:53 on July 11, 2011, Gemma Bagshaw said…

Hiya Moira,

 

No problems! I'm glad I managed to get it all on video. I'm hopefully going to Kelmarsh History Weekend next week so I will take more videos there and put the links up for anyone who's interested.

 

I'd love to meet up with you whenever you come up to Leeds. Just let me know when you are up!

 

Hope you're ok and had a relaxing weekend.

 

Gem. 

At 16:41 on July 11, 2011, Graciela Iglesias Rogers said…

Hi Moira,

Many thanks! I am glad that you enjoyed my talk. I also enjoyed yours and learnt much on maccaronis and attitudes to gender among soldiers.

As promised, here are my details:

Graciela Iglesias Rogers

Lady Margaret Hall,

University of Oxford

53 Fernhill Road,

Begbroke,

Oxford OX5 1RR

Email: graciela.iglesiasrogers@history.ox.ac.uk

Alternative email: graciela.iglesiasrogers@st-hildas.oxon.org

It was lovely to meet you at Leeds!

All the best,

Graciela

At 19:49 on July 12, 2011, Louise Carter said…

Hi Moira,

Likewise it was lovely to meet you and I enjoyed your paper. Look forward to hearing more about the macaronis anon.

best wishes,

Louise.

You need to be a member of Soldiers and Soldiering in Britain 1750-1815 to add comments!

Join Soldiers and Soldiering in Britain 1750-1815

 
 
 

© 2014   Created by Kevin Linch.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service